veit > telecom

 #1  
11.07.2005, 03:44
Joseph
I am not a resident of the Netherlands but I noticed something that
struck me as a bit "odd" in the Netherlands. Most advertisements that
I saw either in print or on television they'd have a 0900 number for
contact. As you probably know when you call a 0900 number you are
charged an amount which can vary with the number. "Premium rate"
numbering is not unfamiliar to me as we have 1-900 numbers in the USA
as well but it's generally only used for "sex lines" and for things
such as calling software support. For most other things for any
contact a toll-free "800" number is often provided especially if it's
national. I don't understand the concept of paying for most all calls
even to make a pledge to a charity! I have seen 0800 numbers but they
are far and few. Toll-free 800 numbers are cheap in the US and just
wondered why it was that there is so much use of 0900 service in the
Netherlands. I'm used to calling T-Mobile for free in the US where in
the Netherlands I pay 15 per minute to call customer service in the
Netherlands.
- -
 #2  
11.07.2005, 07:13
Christa
Sun, 10 Jul 2005 18:44:19 -0700 tikte dan wel citeerde Joseph:

[..]
>Netherlands. I'm used to calling T-Mobile for free in the US where in
>the Netherlands I pay 15 per minute to call customer service in the
>Netherlands.


Phoning in the Netherlands costs a lot, compared to the US. It's much
better then it used to be, but that is especially for calling abroad,
not so much for national or local calls.
 #3  
11.07.2005, 08:03
cato
On 7/11/05 3:44 AM, in article oaj3d11iij9jt1rflhh7fe0knequpr0j7k,
"Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle> wrote:

[..]
> the Netherlands I pay 15 per minute to call customer service in the
> Netherlands.
> - -

You also may have noticed when buying something in a shop or ordering a
drink or food in a bar or restaurant, frequently it is very difficult to get
the attention of the salesperson or waiter. And if you do, very often you
won't get the feeling that they're happy to serve you like you do at home.
People with that attitude make you pay extra for customer service. But
Vodafone in the Netherlands (partner of Verizon) won't charge you and
provides better service than most to boot. Assuming you don't have a
sim-locked phone and are subject to high roaming charges, you're probably
better of using a prepaid calling card from a discount provider like Telfort
if you make a lot of calls in the Netherlands. Avoid Orange; their service
is inferior.
 #4  
11.07.2005, 09:50
Frans Breukelman
Understaffed "0900 support" has becom a main source of income for many
companies. So your 15c/min becomes 4.5 euros/half hour, because that is
the average time you are put on hold. Even the police uses a 0900 number!

So 0900 is a way of generating extra income and a way of dealing with
annoying
customers (as a customer you'll think twice before calling a helpdesk at
these
rates).

"> I saw either in print or on television they'd have a 0900 number for
 #5  
11.07.2005, 10:03
Jeroen Heijmans
Joseph <JoeOfSeattle> wrote:
[..]
> national. I don't understand the concept of paying for most all calls
> even to make a pledge to a charity! I have seen 0800 numbers but they
> are far and few. Toll-free 800 numbers are cheap in the US and just


There are 4 kinds of special numbers:
0800 - toll free
0900 - 'premium rate' information, this can be almost free (mostly not)
0906 - premium rate adult entertainment
0909 - premium rate entertainment

00800 - european toll free number

There are some other kinds of special numbers, these cost almost always more
than geographical numbers.
084x-/087x- personal assistents/services (voicemail, fax2mail, personal numbers)
088- business numbers (national, recently started)
06- mobile fones
0676- data (connect with an ISP)

01x,02x,03x,04x,05x,07x geographical numbers (areacodes)
(see [..] for a complete list with
the corresponding city's)
 #6  
11.07.2005, 11:04
Piet van Oostrum
The USA is much more service-oriented than the Netherlands.
 #7  
11.07.2005, 12:30
Johan Wevers
Christa <mevrahkah> wrote:

>Phoning in the Netherlands costs a lot, compared to the US.


Only when using a fixed line. Mobile is usually much cheaper than
in the US, and it doesn't cost you money when you are called (unless
you're roaming in another country). Not surprisingly, over 10% of the
Dutch households don't have a fixed line anymore.
 #8  
11.07.2005, 15:13
AnToNio
Johan Wevers <johanw> wrote:

> Not surprisingly, over 10% of the
> Dutch households don't have a fixed line anymore.


Says who??
 #9  
11.07.2005, 17:14
??
Joseph schreef :
[..]
> the Netherlands I pay 15 per minute to call customer service in the
> Netherlands.
> - -


Bij ons krijg je zelfs geld toe.

Click here for Translation: [..] (up to 150
words)

Or here:
[..]

Or here: [..]

Or here: [..]

Or here: [..]
 #10  
11.07.2005, 17:37
Dimitri Visser
Hi,

"Joseph" <JoeOfSeattle> wrote in message
news:0j7k

> Netherlands. I'm used to calling T-Mobile for free in the US where in
> the Netherlands I pay 15? per minute to call customer service in the
> Netherlands.


Ofcourse you're never calling for free. In the end you are paying for it
yourself. Having a toll-free number is expensive for the company, they are
paying more for each minute than you would pay calling "national". So
toll-free numbers are actually more expensive for you.
Another disadvantage of toll-free numbers compared to paid numbers is that
people will call more often. Also for the not so important things. A lot of
people call for things which are clearly explained on the website/manual
etc. And you, as a smart customer reading all these things yourself are
paying for the support given to these dumb people.

I have no problems paying E 0,15 / minute when they have to solve the
problems I caused myself. I try to avoid companys where I have to pay to
correct the problems they are making (like T-Mobile).

with kind regards,
Dimitri
 #11  
11.07.2005, 17:40
feicoremvethis
On Sun, 10 Jul 2005 18:44:19 -0700, Joseph <JoeOfSeattle>
wrote in nl.telecom:

>Toll-free 800 numbers are cheap in the US and just
>wondered why it was that there is so much use of 0900 service in the
>Netherlands.


There used to be more 0800 numbers. However, many people call them
without any particular need, and therefore most service providers
decided to replace them by 09 (usually 0900) numbers.

I think Americans do not call 0800 unless they really need it.
 #12  
11.07.2005, 17:41
feicoremvethis
On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 08:03:06 +0000 (UTC), Jeroen Heijmans
<news> wrote in nl.telecom:

>0906 - premium rate adult entertainment


Not adult. It's usually for immature people.
 #13  
11.07.2005, 18:26
Robert Elsinga =8-)
On Mon, 11 Jul 2005 11:04:45 +0200, Piet van Oostrum <piet>
wrote:

>The USA is much more service-oriented than the Netherlands.


Wel... that is only until thay have taken your money. =8-}

(I like the americans, but experienced some very fake-smiling
staff...)
 #14  
11.07.2005, 20:53
Johan Wevers
AnToNio <email> wrote:

>> Not surprisingly, over 10% of the
>> Dutch households don't have a fixed line anymore.

>Says who??


Says several research bureaus. Those numbers are regularly quoted.
I don't think the costs is the only factor that causes this; younger
people are used to using mobiles anyway. And with the right subscription
the total costs of using only a mobile can be lower than than using
a fixed line and less use of the mobile. Combined with the often
inpractical use of a fixed line (you're calling a place instead of a
person) many families dumped the fixed line.
 #15  
11.07.2005, 20:55
Johan Wevers
?? <gorbu@@@@> wrote:

>Bij ons krijg je zelfs geld toe.


(He claims they give you money to call)

The scammer doesn't even speak English?

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